History of Madness – Track 7

Professor Keirsey had his lecture course on Madness taped on cassettes in 1982.  This post is the seventh audio track.  More audio tracks will follow.

Track 1:  The beginning of History of Madness lecture course

He surveys the idea of madness “as far back as we can go”.  At the end of the course, he talks a little about his theory of madness: which he called at the time, “Wholistic Theory of Madness”  based social field theory and Temperament.

Once asked what was the most important thing he wanted people to get from his work, he said:

“I want people to understand that there is no such thing as madness.”

david_keirsey_in_library

Dr. David West Keirsey

Track 7:

Element theory:
Energy element: instinct — provide force.  Archetypes (what Jung called instinct).
There are force elements.  Energy is a force element with energy in it.  Forces are in centers – confining barrier.  “They got problems there.”
Hydraulic Metaphor:  Values, tubes, and chambers.  Chambers: SuperEgo, Ego, Id.

Wholistic theory:
The Gestalt

Laws of Configuration.

The form is inherent.

The theory of type.

Field Theory.

The mind-body “problem” of elementalism.

The Wholistic View.

Wheeler’s Laws of Human Nature

Systems and polarities

Posted in The History of Madness | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

It’s a Slow Idea

tortoise-hare

Many people have asked why is Keirsey Temperament Theory not known broadly as “it should be.”

For a long time, I couldn’t give a good answer.

The answer is: “It’s a Slow Idea.”

My father outlines “The History of Madness”  in his lectures.  And the Wholistic Theory of Madness is a slow idea, its roots going back to over a century with my father adding the idea of Temperament in the last half century.   Fast Ideas about “madness” have been around since Homo Sapens possessed language.

The roots of the Idea of Keirsey Temperament also go back to ancient times.

In addition, there is the idea of: Slow Ideas <=> Fast Ideas

The root of this idea appeared just recently, thanks to Atul Gawande.

Continue reading

Posted in David Mark Keirsey blogs | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

History of Madness – Track 6

Professor Keirsey had his lecture course on Madness taped on cassettes in 1982.  This post is the sixth audio track.  Some parts of the lectures are missing.  But, more audio tracks will follow.

Track 1:  The beginning of History of Madness lecture course

He surveys the idea of madness “as far back as we can go”.  At the end of the course, he talks a little about his theory of madness: which he called at the time, “Wholistic Theory of Madness”  based social field theory and Temperament.

Once asked what was the most important thing he wanted people to get from his work, he said:

“I want people to understand that there is no such thing as madness.”

david_keirsey_in_library

Dr. David West Keirsey

Track 6:

The last part of elementalism
Role theory: Adler, Moreno, Sullivan, Kelly, Ellis, Berne
Programs, Drama, Game, Script, Lifeline

Eric Berne: Hydraulics and Electronic.  Robot Theory.

Elements cause behavior.  The person is programmed not relevant to the situation.  One flaw, the “crazy” is not listening to feedback.

Bateson, Haley

Wholistic Theory: opposite of elementalism.

There is a system: Gestalt.

No causal elements.  Polarity

Self Actualization – Kurt Goldstein

Changing and staying the same.  Self distribution.  Self regulation.

Elementalists
Tape recording (Elron Hubbard – never abandoned metaphor )

The elementalists [Freud, Jung, Adler, etc.] never decoded their metaphors into things you can see.  “Freud’s fiction”  Attractor elements, Integrator elements.

Track 7

Posted in The History of Madness | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

History of Madness – Track 5

Professor Keirsey had his lecture course on Madness taped on cassettes in 1982.  This post is the fifth audio track.  More audio tracks will follow.

Track 1:  The beginning of History of Madness lecture course

He surveys the idea of madness “as far back as we can go”.  At the end of the course, he talks a little about his theory of madness: which he called at the time, “Wholistic Theory of Madness”  based social field theory and Temperament.

Once asked what was the most important thing he wanted people to get from his work, he said:

“I want people to understand that there is no such thing as madness.”

david_keirsey_in_library

Dr. David West Keirsey

Track 5:

Revolutions: slow ideas in Science.
Why people hold on to old fast ideas, and attack the new slow idea.

Kretschmer, Shapiro, Angel.  Madness in Character.  Rausch.  Disorders of Communication.

Penultimate Step: Haley

Erickson, Bateson, Haley.  Scapegoat and the “Schizophrenic”

Madness is hypnotic. [Fear is hypnotic]  Strategies in Psychotherapy.

Wholism:  Hegel  Law of Reciprocity, the death of Gestalt Psychology – Max Wertheimer, Kurt Lewin, Kurt Koffka, Wolfgang Kohler.  Ernst Cassirer, Raymond Holder Wheeler and Francis Theodore Perkins.

Wholism: is Not elementalism.

Elementalism in “psychology”
Freud, … , Skinner

Track 5 Audio

Track 6

Posted in The History of Madness, theory | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

History of Madness – Track 3-4

Professor Keirsey had his lecture course on Madness taped on cassettes in 1982.  This post is the fourth (there was no third)  audio track.  More audio tracks will follow.

Track 1:  The beginning of History of Madness lecture course

He surveys the idea of madness “as far back as we can go”.  At the end of the course, he talks a little about his theory of madness: which he called at the time, “Wholistic Theory of Madness”  based social field theory and Temperament.

Once asked what was the most important thing he wanted people to get from his work, he said:

“I want people to understand that there is no such thing as madness.”

david_keirsey_in_library

Dr. David West Keirsey

Track 3-4:

The revolting Freud.  Madness is defensive.

“These strange antics were seen as functional.  The mad act had a job to do.  It served a purpose. It had an end. It was manufactured by the person to accomplish something.”  …

“This behavior makes sense. … It’s a message.  … The reason is to protect ourselves.” …

“Do we protect ourselves, this consciously, …?  No, It’s all unconscious.”

“People do crazy things to protect themselves.”
— Dr. David West Keirsey

Freud added that defensive behavior was to protect the “libido.”

The steps toward the Wholistic Theory of Madness.

Adler: Defense of Pride (Self-Esteem, Self-Regard).  The start of the social theory of madness.  Kretschmer: Schizophrenic and Cyclothymic.  Sheldon.  Character theory of madness.

Bateson and Haley: Toward a Theory of Schizophrenia.  Social field theory of Madness.

Track 5

Posted in The History of Madness | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

History of Madness – Track 2

Professor Keirsey had his lecture course on Madness taped in 1982.  This post is the second audio track.  More audio tracks will follow.

Track 1:  The beginning of History of Madness lecture course

He surveys the idea of madness “as far back as we can go”.  At the end of the course, he talks a little about his theory of madness.

Once asked what was the most important thing he wanted people to get from his work, he said:

“I want people to understand that there is no such thing as madness.”

david_keirsey_in_library

Track 2:  Witches and Sorcerers. 17th century the advent of Mesmerism. Somnambulism, 19th century. The belief of illness.  The idea of suggestion.  Hypnotism.  The Classifiers.  Greeklish.  Bad Organs.

Track 3-4

Posted in The History of Madness | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

The History of Madness — Track 1

Professor Keirsey had his lecture course on Madness taped in 1982.  This is the first audio track.  More audio tracks will follow.

He surveys the idea of madness “as far back as we can go”.  At the end of the course, he talks a little about his theory of madness.

Once asked what was the most important thing he wanted people to get from his work, he said:

“I want people to understand that there is no such thing as madness.”

david_keirsey_in_library

History of Madness, Track 2

Posted in The History of Madness | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment